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Posts Tagged ‘Accordo dei Contrari’

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While searching for a suitable title for my customary “year in review” essay, I thought of something that would convey the general mood of my 2014 while emphasizing the role that music had in helping me out of a bout of potentially severe depression. This is how I came out with this title (shared by a song from Rainbow’s iconic Rising album) and the image that goes with it. The first six months of the year were spent in a sort of daze, in which I tried to keep up with listening and reviewing new music, but was increasingly consumed by a job assignment that ultimately got me burned out. Over the summer months I gradually withdrew from social life, and lost most of my interest in music – to the point that, when ProgDay was approaching, I almost decided to bail out and stay home. The low number of posts on my blog bears witness to this sorry state of affairs – which was thankfully brought to an end by a very enjoyable ProgDay experience. Music, as usual, did help me out of a black hole, and so did the friendships I have made over the years thanks to this lifelong passion of mine.

After such an introduction, it will not come as a surprise that many of this year’s highly regarded albums escaped my attention, and even those I did manage to hear did not impress as much as they would have in a different situation. This 2014 overview may therefore contain some glaring omissions, for which I apologize. Keeping track of the staggering number of new releases in the progressive realm is difficult under normal circumstances, and even harder when real life gets in the way.

Although my full-length reviews have become a much rarer item, since February 2014 I have been regularly providing recommendations for an excellent new feature (the brainchild of DPRP longtime collaborator and editor Andy Read) by the name of Something for the Weekend?. Dedicated exclusively to progressive music available for free streaming on invaluable resources such as Progstreaming or Bandcamp, this weekly feature has allowed me to promote the work of many outstanding artists – as well as exploring a lot of exciting new music that might have otherwise flown under the radar. Going back to ProgArchives, the thriving website where I started my career as a reviewer back in 2005 (and also met my husband), after a four-year absence has also been very beneficial in terms of discovering new music and cultivating fulfilling relationships.

The past year saw my personal tastes shift even further away from traditional prog, and wholeheartedly embrace the new incarnations of the genre. While this does not mean I have stopped enjoying classic prog, I recognize that, in the second decade of the 21st century, the genre needs to look forward rather than backward if it is to survive. Speaking of which, having resolutely moved underground is probably the best thing to happen to progressive rock in the past few years. In spite of the many difficulties they face, many progressive artists now produce music to please themselves first and foremost. Without having to obey the constraints of the “market”, artistic creativity can be given free rein, so that we can expect the next few years to be generous with high-quality releases.

My personal “best of 2014” spans different subgenres of prog, with a pronounced emphasis on the eclectic and experimental side of things. Though often labeled as RIO/Avant, my album of the year – Ut Gret’s marvelous Ancestor’s Tale – is the best Canterbury album to be released in a long while (though the band hail from Louisville, Kentucky), and introduced the prog audience to the stunning vocal talents of songstress Cheyenne Mize. Incidentally, another two of my favourite 2014 albums came from bands that have occasionally been associated with the Canterbury sound – though. Like Ut Gret, neither hails from that part of the world. Moraine’s  Groundswell, is their most mature work to date, showcasing the Seattle quintet’s unique brand of ethnic-tinged, contemporary jazz-rock. On the other hand Italian quartet Accordo dei Contrari’s comeback album, AdC , saw them explore heavier territories, though retaining the exquisite sense of melody that distinguishes Giovanni Parmeggiani’s compositional style.

As a whole, 2014 was an uncommonly good year for eclectic releases that avoided the “old wine in new bottles” syndrome. Knifeworld’s sophomore release, The Unraveling, spearheaded this highly individual approach to the creation of progressive rock. Also appearing on Gong’s latest effort, I See You, Knifeworld mainman Kavus Torabi seems poised to replace Steven Wilson as the busiest man in prog, though with a much more genuinely innovative attitude. Torabi’s longtime collaborator and bandmate Emmett Elvin’s Bloody Marvels was true to its title, delivering a series of deeply cinematic, atmospheric pieces mostly performed on acoustic instruments, released on independent British label Bad Elephant Music – which in 2014 distinguished itself as one of the foremost purveyors of interesting progressive fare. Together with Elvin’s album, guitarist Matt Stevens’ Lucid and Trojan Horse’s “pronk” assault World Upside Down proved that the British isles have got more to offer than endless variations on the neo-prog gospel. As for Sound Mirror, the highly touted second album by “new Canterburians” Syd Arthur (their first for the revamped Harvest label), I only managed to get hold of it when I had already started writing this piece: my initial impression is positive, though the album is definitely in a more mainstream vein.

One of the biggest surprises of the year, mentioned as a favourite by many prog fans, came from Norwegian outfit Seven Impale: their furiously sax-driven, full-length debut, City of the Sun, combines echoes of King Crimson and Van Der Graaf Generator with an endearingly zany sense of humour. Fellow Norwegians Major Parkinson’s “cabaret rock” opus Twilight Cinema also drew a lot of rave reviews, as did Swedes Pingvinorkestern’s heady melting pot Push. Spain’s ebullient Cheeto’s Magazine offered more Zappaesque, genre-bending goodness with their debut, Boiling Fowls, while French outfit PoiL’s Brossaklitt went beyond Magma and their offspring, with lyrics in an invented language set to an explosive mixture of punk, jazz and RIO/Avant. From the eastern reaches of Europe, Russian quartet Uphill Work’s third album, Missing Opportunities, struck a fine balance between the traditional song form and eccentric avant-garde.

The sprawling US scene achieved its fair share of cliché-busting releases, such as Atomic Ape’s frenetic debut, Swarm (introducing a revamped lineup of Orange Tulip Conspiracy), or Jack O’The Clock’s mysterious Night Loops, a rather different album from last year’s folksy All My Friends. Bent Knee’s Shiny-Eyed Babies reinterprets art rock in thoroughly modern fashion -occasionally reminiscent of their fellow Bostonians Schooltree, though in a darker, more experimental vein. The Pacific Northwest scene produced the melancholy folk-prog of The Autumn Electric’s Flowers for Ambrosia (featuring Phideaux’s keyboardist Johnny Unicorn) as well as the furious “pronk” of Alex’s Hand’s The Roaches and Badwater Fire Company’s eponymous debut, the elegant eclecticism of The Mercury Tree’s Countenance, and the experimental jazz-rock of Fang Chia’s Where Would You That We Gather?. From New York City came the dirty funk of Tauk’s Collisions and the Zappa-inflected jazz-rock of Trout Cake’s EP Ultrasounds (recommended to fans of Frogg Café). Somewhat more appealing to prog traditionalists, Resistor’s To the Stars blends a lot of diverse influences (think Kansas, Iron Maiden and Jethro Tull jamming together with a very 21st-century attitude) for one of the year’s most intriguing “crossover” offerings, while Dream the Electric Sleep’s powerful second album Heretics treads in grunge/alternative territory. Minneapolis quartet  Galactic Cowboy Orchestra also released a new album, Zombie Mouth, and at the end of August wowed the ProgDay crowd with their sparkling brand of “jazzgrass art-rock”.

Instrumental progressive rock in its many forms continues to be a source of interest and delight. After 2013’s psychedelic opus, The Trip, Djam Karet celebrated their 30th anniversary with the über-laid-back Regenerator 3017, while their label Firepool Records brought to the prog audience’s attention the riveting self-titled debut by Spoke of Shadows, the latest project by Warr guitar wizard Mark Cook (of Herd of Instinct fame) in collaboration with renowned session drummer Bill Bachman. One of the year’s undisputed highlights, however, came once again from the cold climes of Sweden, with Necromonkey’s mesmerizing second album, A Glimpse of Possible Endings – complemented later in the year by a career-defining appearance at ProgDay.

Alongside Moraine’s pristine album, the ever-reliable Moonjune Records provided at least another entry to my personal “best of 2014” list: Belgian songstress Susan Clynes’s delightful debut, Life Is… – a must-listen for fans of Kate Bush and Tori Amos, but also for lovers of contemporary jazz. Keeping up his efforts at promoting the Indonesian progressive jazz-rock scene, Leonardo Pavkovic also brought us the latest opuses from established guitar heroes Tohpati (Tribal Dance) and Dewa Budjana (Surya Namaskar), as well as rising star Tesla Manaf’s self-titled debut, and simakDialog’s Live at Orion (capturing a gig that I was lucky to attend). Another live album, The Third Set, came from Chicago whizz kids Marbin, one of the busiest bands on the planet; while the European scene gave us drummer Xavi Reija’s thunderous Resolution and the majestic modern jazz-rock tour de force of Machine Mass Trio’s Inti.

Milan-based label AltrOck Productions kept its unflagging tradition of delivering high-class material to sophisticated prog listeners looking for distinctive musical experiences: besides the already-mentioned Ut Gret, Accordo dei Contrari and PoiL, the re-release of Geranium by Russian folksy RIO/Avant outfit Vezhlivyi Otkaz, the jazz-rock-meets-space-rock craziness of Wrupk Urei’s Kõik Saab Korda, the almost impenetrable, yet fascinating Avant of Factor Burzaco’s 3, enhanced by Carolina Restuccia’s vertiginous vocals.

Indeed, 2014 was a great year for bands fronted by female vocalists. One of the most anticipated releases of the year was undoubtedly MoeTar’s scintillating Entropy of the Century, a quintessential modern art rock effort showcasing Moorea Dickason’s jaw-dropping vocal skills. Kate Bush fans certainly found a lot to love in Russian duo iamthemorning’s delicate, haunting Belighted. In a similar vein, the debut of Swedish band Nomads of Hope (including two former members of late Seventies band Kultivator), Breaking the Circles for a While, marries folk and medieval music with haunting trip-hop suggestions, while Finnish outfit Aalto’s Ikaro introduces elements of Tuvan throat singing and North Indian raga. Many accolades were also received by Homínido‘s debut Estirpe Litica, another highly eclectic effort featuring some former members of Chilean band La Desoorden.

Plenty of interesting new releases came both from newcomers and seasoned protagonists of the thriving Italian scene: among the many worth mentioning, Fabio Zuffanti’s somberly ambitious La quarta vittima, Alex Carpani Band’s modern symphonic 4 Destinies, FEM’s lush concept Sulla bolla di sapone, Nodo Gordiano’s intricate Nous, Agora’s lovely slice of acoustic jazz-rock Ichinen, Greenwall’s melodic yet whimsical Zappa Zippa Zuppa Zeppa, the space-tinged classic RPI of LogosL’enigma della vita, Tacita Intesa’s dramatic, self-titled debut. On the other hand, Lagartija’s Amore di vinile and Marco Machera’s Dime Novels explored the successful union of prog and singer-songwriter music, while Periplo’s debut, Diario di un malessere passeggero, offered an intriguing slice of stylish chamber rock. Sadly, the Italian prog scene suffered an irreparable loss in February, when legendary Banco vocalist Francesco Di Giacomo was killed in a car crash.

Even if I have grown away from classic symphonic prog, a few 2014 releases brought a breath of fresh air in a subgenre that can often sound stale. Kant Freud Kafka’s No Tengas Miedo brought to mind The Enid’s unique brand of majestic, classical-inspired prog, while Deluge Grander’s powerfully choral Heliotians – printed in only 205 hand-numbered, hand-painted LP copies –distilled the very essence of the modern DIY ethos. Those disappointed with Yes’ recent lackluster recording efforts found a lot of enjoyment in Heliopolis’ bright, feel-good debut, City of the Sun. Australia’s The Merlin Bird’s offered lovely female vocals and pastoral textures in their second album, Chapter and Verse, while Eccentric Orbit went for an all-out, ELP-style keyboard assault in Creation of the Humanoids.

2014 also brought some interesting solo projects, with the brilliant heavy fusion of Dean Watson’s Fantasizer!, the eclectic jazz-rock concept of Superfluous Motor’s Shipwrecked, the hauntingly intimist album by  Bodies Floating Ashore (aka Matt Lebofsky of miRthkon/MoeTar/Secret Chiefs 3 fame), and Simon McKechnie’s brainy, Crimsonian tour de force, Newton’s Alchemy.

Unfortunately, some of this year’s notable releases still remain unheard to this day: for instance, Univers Zéro’s Phosphorescent Dreams (released by an obscure Japanese label, and therefore very hard to find), Gong’s I See You, Secret Chiefs 3’s Ishraqiyun: Perichoresis, KaukasusI, and all of Cuneiform Records’ 2014 output. Other high-profile albums have been discussed in detail by most prog websites, but will not be mentioned here for a number of reasons. I have also refrained from mentioning albums I did not particularly enjoy, because I find negativity ultimately pointless, and also because quite a few fellow music writers have already published comprehensive “year in review” pieces covering many of the albums that have not found a place here.

No “year in review” piece would be complete without a mention of live performances. Even if my personal concert-going activity was very limited in comparison to previous years, 2014 was quite generous in terms of festivals and shows, with the continuing success of ROSfest, the return of Baja Prog (unfortunately suspended for 2015), the second editions of SeaProg and the NJ Proghouse Homecoming Weekend (both confirmed for 2015), ProgDay’s 20th edition, and the Orion Studios‘ marvelous 20th anniversary celebration – as well as the welcome addition of A Day of Prog Art Rock Showcase, organized by the New England Art Rock Society(NewEARS) in the Boston metropolitan area, and Chicago’s two-day Progtoberfest.

My commitment to Something for the Weekend? provided the incentive to explore and actively look for new music to recommend to the feature’s steadily increasing number of readers (50,000 were reached a couple of weeks before the end of the year). What I jokingly call my “collection” of interesting new music bookmarks is also steadily growing. Bandcamp, in particular, is like an underground treasure trove that more and more artists are using to give exposure to their music, embracing a model that rules out any kind of financial gain, but thrives on positive feedback and direct communication with fans. Actively seeking out challenging new music, and making a point of listening to at least one album a day (preferably early in the morning, before I start getting ready to go to work) has become a pleasant routine that has helped me to keep in touch with the scene.

Since many of the albums mentioned in this essay are available for streaming, I hope this lengthy feature will encourage at least some of my readers to click on the hyperlinks and listen to those artists, and perhaps invest a few dollars (or any other currency) to buy a CD or two. As much as I enjoy the classics, I firmly believe that the future of progressive music lies with these people, whose dedication to music often means struggling with less than favourable circumstances, including the lack of support on the part of their intended audience. This essay is dedicated to them, with my most heartfelt thanks for the gift of music and its positive effect on my life.

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TRACKLISTING:
1. Nadir (9:31)
2. Dandelion (4:47)
3. Seth Zeugma (5:48)
4. Dua (5:44)
5. Tiglath (8:28)
6. Più Limpida e Chiara di Ogni Impressione Vissuta (Pt.2) (3:21)

LINEUP:
Cristian Franchi – drums
Giovanni Parmeggiani – Fender Rhodes, Hammond organ, minimoog, acoustic piano
Daniele Piccinini – bass guitar
Marco Marzo Maracas – electric and acoustic guitar

With:
Vladimiro Cantaluppi – violin (3), viola (6)
Marina Scaramagli – cello (6)
Enrico Guerzoni – cello (3)

For my first album review after over four months of silence, what better choice than the new album of one of the most interesting new bands of the past few years – Bologna’s own Accordo dei Contrari, who managed to impress the ProgDay crowd in 2012 in spite of performing at the hottest time of a truly sweltering day? Three years after the highly praised Kublaione of my top albums for 2011 – the young but immensely talented Italian quartet have made their comeback with an album whose title is as minimalistic as its striking artwork (courtesy of drummer Cristian Franchi and Dario D’Alessandro of fellow AltrOckers Homunculus Res). AdC also marks the band’s return to the AltrOck roster, as they their debut, Kinesis (at present unfortunately still out of print), had been released in 2006 by the Milan-based label.

Clocking in at a mere 37 minutes, AdC is highly concentrated, and in many ways different from its predecessor – though there are some unmistakable signs of continuity to be found. According to the English-language liner notes, the album was recorded over a very short period of time, in an almost “live in the studio” situation. While “Dua” and “Seth Zeugma” date back from the time the band was working on Kublai (though they did not find a place on that album), the remaining four tracks were all composed in the intervening years. Although far from unusual, this state of affairs might have resulted in a patchy effort, but fortunately AdC – no matter how chequered its history may be – has turned out to be remarkably cohesive.

Completely instrumental (unlike Kublai, which saw the participation of Canterbury legend Richard Sinclair on one track), and with only two tracks over the 6-minute mark, it leaves very little room for self-indulgence – a danger often lurking in a subgenre like jazz-rock, which thrives on technical proficiency. The four band members weave a tight web of sound, each contributing his own individual imprint, but always keeping an eye an eye to the final result. As a whole, AdC comes across as heavier than its predecessor, with Marco Marzo’s electric guitar playing a leading role and lending a keen edge to keyboardist Giovanni Parmeggiani’s sophisticated writing. This time around, one can definitely hear less Canterbury and more Area in Accordo dei Contrari’s music.

The almost 10-minute “Nadir” opens the album with the ominous, cinematic impact of surging synths, then all the other instruments chime in, foregrounding guitar and drums in a well-paced, jazzy romp that blends energy and melody. The exhilarating contrast between Marzo’s gritty guitar and Parmeggiani’s liquid piano demonstrates the band’s excellent control of quiet-loud dynamics. Marzo’s six strings, offset by discreet Hammond organ, step forward right from the start of the shorter but punchy “Dandelion”, while Daniele Piccinini and Cristian Franchi’s flawless rhythm backbone imparts a choppy, energizing pace to the composition. Introduced by the lovely classical feel of grand piano and strings, “Seth Zeugma” soon veers into hard rock territory, guitar and organ sparring in a fashion reminiscent of classic Deep Purple or Colosseum II.

Piano and drums take firmly the lead in “Dua”, with melodic flurries and a gentle, waltz-like pace at the beginning, then a choppy, stop-start movement that culminates in a driving, insistent coda. In the 8-minute “Tiglath”, the band carefully build up a crescendo from a very sparse, atmospheric opening, with a vaguely Oriental tune followed by some intense, gritty guitar and organ exertions made more interesting by asymmetrical rhythm patterns. The short and sweet “Più Limpida e Chiara di Ogni Impressione Vissuta (Pt.2)” closes the album on a very different note, the somber drone of the cello underpinning lyrical violin and pensive guitar arpeggios.

Enhanced by Udi Koomran’s expert mastering, and produced by AltrOck’s own founder, Marcello Marinone, AdC may be over a bit too soon, but it definitely makes up in quality for what it may lack in running time. The album shows a band at the top of their game, capable of engaging in unbridled jazz-rock workouts as well as laying down understated, classical-tinged melodies. Highly recommended to lovers of instrumental progressive rock, AdC will please the band’s following, while wetting their appetite for Accordo dei Contrari’s next release.

Links:
http://accordodeicontrari.bandcamp.com/album/adc-2014
http://www.accordodeicontrari.com/
http://www.altrock.it

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Though the title of this review is not meant to spark a debate on climate change, it is an apt description of the kind of atmosphere that characterized the 18th consecutive edition of ProgDay. If my first time at the festival, back in 2010, had been perfect climate-wise, and the second marred by a rather uncomfortably hot and humid Saturday, this year was record-breaking, and not in a good way. To put it bluntly, the past weekend on the lovely grounds of Storybook Farm felt like being  in Bangkok or Singapore in the middle of the summer, with temperatures in the mid-90s (especially on Saturday), and humidity close to 90%. For a hot-weather hater such as myself, it was a nightmare scenario. After this weekend, I believe I know how chocolate must feel when melted slowly on the stove… The last hurrah of this long, hot summer – quite unexpected after a rather mild August – might have wreaked some serious havoc on the festival, and indeed the unrelenting heat affected many people’s enjoyment of a spectacular weekend of music.

Adverse climatic conditions notwithstanding, ProgDay 2012 was fulfilling in every sense, and even the physical discomfort of trying to find relief from the onslaught of the heat pales in comparison to the wonderful musical offer and overall atmosphere of the 18th edition of the world’s longest-running progressive rock festival. Many of the observations I made in my review of the 2011 edition hold true for this one as well, so I will spare my readers a repeat and try to include some new insights. If last year’s ProgDay had been a success, this one was nearly a triumph, from many different points of view. The musical aspect, of course, is fundamental in any such event, and the festival seems to be going from strength to strength in assembling lineups that manage to capture the best of the contemporary progressive rock scene. However, no event can exist in a vacuum, and the human factor is of paramount importance whenever the arts are concerned.

On Friday morning, the leisurely, four-hour drive from our Northern Virginia home took us down the familiar, tree-lined corridor of Highway 85, a quiet and sparsely frequented route in comparison to the unceasing bustle of the Baltimore/Washington area. For long stretches of the road, no cars could be seen ahead of us, and the feeling of being in the middle of nowhere was somewhat eerie, but also deeply charming in its own way. The last two hours of the drive prepared us for the unique ambiance of the festival, where the attractions of nature and music are magically fused together, and nourished by friendship and the joy of being almost removed from “civilization” and the demands of everyday life.

We reached Durham in the early afternoon, just in time for a satisfying lunch at the BBQ place across the road from the hotel. Then, after some well-deserved rest, it was time for us to meet friends that, while separated from us by geography, are a constant part of our lives thanks to modern technology. Unfortunately, the oppressive heat was getting worse by the hour, and on Saturday morning it was immediately clear that things were going to be anything but pleasant weather-wise. That suffocating blanket of humidity was something I had hardly ever experienced before – and I come from a country where summers can get quite hot. When we got to Storybook Farm, the grass was wet with dew, and a very faint breeze blew from the trees. The high humidity made the surroundings even more beautiful than usual, and the occasional hawks circling overhead added to the almost magical atmosphere. However, as the day progressed, the discomfort caused by the heat was compounded by the misery of feeling sticky and dirty. Beneath the corrugated metal roof of the stage, the heat must have been unbearable, and a large fan had been strategically placed at the back of the stage in an attempt to make things marginally more comfortable for the bands and the crew.

Though they had landed the somewhat awkward opening slot at 10.30 in the morning, the music of Northern Virginia’s finest, Ephemeral Sun, would have made a perfect soundtrack for what T.S. Eliot called “the violet hour”. The young and personable quartet, led by the impossibly fresh-faced John Battema (an outstanding keyboardist and a real gentleman) have transitioned from a Gothic-metal, female-fronted outfit to a much more distinctive, hard to label brand of cinematic, ambient-laden instrumental prog, rich in melody yet laced with heaviness. In some ways, they reminded me of last year’s opening act, Fibonacci Sequence – though the Wisconsin band’s sound is more muscular and not as atmospheric. The band as a whole proved to have an impressive mastery in the build-up of surging waves of sound, driven by the impeccable rhythm section of Charles Gore and Jeff Malone, with Gore’s deep, powerful bass lines occasionally reminiscent of Geezer Butler’s genre-defining style. Guitarist Brian O’Neill’s occasional bouts of razor-sharp riffing injected a healthy dose of remarkably uncheesy heaviness in the fabric of Battema’s lush keyboards – at times unleashed to resemble a modern-day Keith Emerson, at others relying on stately mellotron samples to bolster and lend symphonic fullness to the soaring, Gilmour-tinged lead guitar parts. While at first communication with the audience was kept to a minimum, it did not take long for the band to open up, and for Battema to display some of his endearingly self-deprecating sense of humour. All in all, it was an excellent opening set from a band that has definitely a lot of potential for future greatness.

John Battema of Ephemeral Sun

By the time Montreal-based quartet Karcius got on stage, the heat and humidity were starting to get out of control. Before the start of their set, I had forced myself to eat some of the rather tasty food on offer, then sat down again with my notepad – only to realize that the heat was badly sapping my enjoyment of the music. I had heard a lot of praise about the band, who – in spite of their young age – already have four albums and a number of high-profile live appearances under their belt. Though I had seen them described as jazz-rock, they sounded all over the place, reminding me of those bands  who, like Umphrey’s McGee, straddle the line between the jam scene and progressive rock proper. The jazz-rock matrix was conveyed by the emphasis on the sleek interplay between Sylvain Auclair’s bass and Thomas Brodeur’s drums, but other influences cropped up with regularity. While Auclair’s blues-tinged voice was undoubtedly good, I felt that it did not actually gel with the rest of the sound, and the instrumental parts (such as the excellent opening track) were a much better representation of Karcius’ collective strength. While I usually appreciate eclecticism, there was a sense of lack of cohesion in the way the band handled their diverse sources of inspiration, which ranged from metal (with a couple of frantic passages verging on speed metal) to King Crimson by way of Steely Dan, and a lot of other stuff – including hints of reggae and other ethnic music, as well as evident pop touches conveyed by the vocals. On the other hand, the chemistry between the four musicians was outstanding, with the ease born of a long collaboration and plenty of stage experience. Mingan Sauriol manned the keyboards with aplomb, rounding out the dynamic rhythm section, while guitarist Simon L’Espérance contributed a nice rock edge. The band also catered to the nostalgia-inclined members of the crowd by performing a cover of Pink Floyd’s “Dogs” (perhaps not the best choice, seen the song’s running time and somewhat depressing subject matter) almost at the end of their set.

Simon L’Espérance and Sylvan Auclair of Karcius

After waxing lyrical for months about Kublai, their sophomore release, and raging about their aborted participation to the ill-fated 2011 edition of NEARfest, I had been elated to learn of my fellow Italians Accordo dei Contrari being selected for Progday 2012. Needless to say, theirs was my most anticipated set of the whole festival, and – even if they had the bad luck to perform in the worst slot of such a miserably hot day (though a breeze made things temporarily more bearable in the afternoon, before the blanket of humidity descended again) – the Bologna-based quartet delivered the goods in abundance. The audience was held captive for the best part of their 90-minute set, which comprised a selection of tracks from their two albums, plus two new numbers that will be featured on their third release. With its trademark blend of jazzy, Canterbury-inspired elegance, uniquely Italian melodic flair and sinuous exotic touches, solidly anchored by Cristian Franchi and Daniele Piccinini’s seamless rhythm section and spiced by Marco Marzo’s fluid guitar, the band’s music manages to sound modern even when paying homage to the past. Keyboardist Giovanni Parmeggiani (the band’s main composer and driving force) acquitted himself splendidly in handling unfamiliar gear (kindly provided by Ephemeral Sun’s John Battema, in an admirable example of cooperation between musicians from different backgrounds), and his rich, heady textures were at the heart of  Accordo dei Contrari’s complex yet smoothly flowing sound. Their exhilarating jam with Birdsongs of the Mesozoic’s Ken Field guesting on saxophone was definitely one of the highlights of the whole weekend. Though their music may elicit comparisons with  D.F.A. (especially for those who had witnessed the latter band’s highly acclaimed American performances), Accordo dei Contrari sound even tighter and more focused in their approach. The band members were absolutely elated to be there, and – even if a bit shy at first – won the hearts of the audience with their professional yet warm attitude. On a personal level, it was a real pleasure to meet them at last, and to have the opportunity to speak my native tongue with like-minded people.

Giovanni Parmeggiani of Accordo dei Contrari

When Birdsongs of the Mesozoic – another instrumental quartet, though one with considerable experience and a respectable back catalogue (their first incarnation dates back from the early Eighties) – took to the stage, the breeze had died out, and the majority of the attendees were wilting in their seats. Of all the past weekend’s performances, this was the one most negatively affected by the hostile weather conditions, as people seemed to have no energy left – which obviously did no favours to the Boston ensemble’s beautiful, highly idiosyncratic music. I was feeling so drained that, about half an hour through their set, my attention started to wander  – even though my brain perceived the beauty of the music and desperately wanted to enjoy it. In any case, Birdsongs of the Mesozoic are one of the most genuinely intriguing musical offers I have heard in the past few years. Blending jazz, rock, minimalism and classical music, they have all the hallmarks of a chamber ensemble without using classical instruments, privileging instead Rick Scott’s eerie electronic effects and Erik Lindgren’s stunning piano, whose rippling, liquid sound gently accompanied the slow setting of the sun. Michael Bierylo’s guitar and Ken Field’s woodwinds complemented the keyboard textures with elegance and emotion; while percussion was added rather sparingly by a drum machine and, very occasionally, a floor tom. The hypnotic, often soothing cadence of their sound – intricate but without the knotty, daunting feel of the average RIO/Avant band – had a cinematic yet touchingly intimate quality. When I was still able to concentrate on the music, I mentally compared them to The Muffins, who had headlined my first ProgDay in 2010. Though the Baltimore band have more of a rock flair, with percussion playing a bigger role, the two outfits’ approach is in some ways similar. All in all, Birdsongs of the Mesozoic regaled the audience with some astonishingly beautiful moments, and I would love to listen to them again in more favourable circumstances.

Erik Lindgren and Michael Bierylo of Birdsongs of the Mesozoic

Like other attendees, we had bought tickets for the Dead Can Dance concert in Durham on the same evening. However, we both realized that we were so exhausted that all we wanted was a quiet meal followed by some well-deserved rest. In any case, we were in no shape to enjoy the show, even in the comfort of an air-conditioned theatre. So we headed back to the hotel, had dinner and went to bed, in order to be in properly refreshed for the following day.

On Sunday morning, the temperature was marginally more comfortable than on the previous day, and the cloudy sky promised at least some respite from the sun. The humidity level, however, was still very high, and did not encourage moving around too much. At 10.30, right on schedule, New Hampshire trio Dreadnaught took to the stage, and treated the audience to a set that someone aptly described as “how Yes would sound if they played country music”. Led by Bob Lord’s massive Rickenbacker sound, the trio are one of the best-kept secrets of the US progressive rock scene – in spite of having been around for over 10 years. Clearly comfortable in a live setting, the three members moved around with plenty of energy, and their highly eclectic take on the classic power trio format combined sterling chops with a friendly, relaxed attitude that put the crowd at ease. The American roots of their sound –  country, bluegrass and also a hint of blues – got added spice from some heavier touches (which occasionally put me in mind of Rush’s instrumental output) – somewhat similar to Karcius in approach, though more focused and with better songwriting. Drummer Rick Habib complemented Lord’s powerful yet intricate lines with his dynamic though never overstated drumming, and also supplied occasional lead vocals. As in the case of Karcius, Dreadnaught work best as an instrumental trio, with Justin Walton’s guitar contributing melody and a bit of a sharp edge to the complex patterns laid out by the rhythm section. Such demanding music can easily become a chore for listeners if not supported by an adequately light-hearted attitude, but Dreadnaught looked as if they were thoroughly enjoying themselves, and communicated their visible enthusiasm to the crowd in spite of the draining heat.

Dreadnaught

By the time Doctor Nerve made their appearance on stage, the sky had turned very dark.  Sparse drops of rain began to fall, thunder rumbled overhead, and the sense of relief from the heat mingled with worry. Summer storms in that region are not to be taken lightly, as they can be extremely violent, and being caught by one of them in an open field was a potentially dangerous situation. However, the New York-based ensemble’s pyrotechnic performance managed to drive the clouds away. Led by charismatic guitarist Nick Didkovsky – a consummate frontman with an endearingly spunky attitude and wacky sense of humour –  the veteran eight-piece had been introduced as a brain-melting experience, which was not far from the truth. Definitely the kind of band that is bound to send traditional-minded prog fans running from the exits at high speed, they delivered a set that, while characterized by a high level of energy, also offered moments of exquisite beauty – as in the slow, meditative track dedicated to the memory of Niall Coti-Sears, Paul Sears’ son, killed in Afghanistan at the end of June. Doctor Nerve was also the only band that included a woman in their lineup – keyboardist Kathleen Supove, a classically-trained pianist with a remarkable stage presence in spite of her petite frame. While Didkovsky’s blistering guitar infused a strong metal component in the band’s music, the impressive horn section (featuring Yves Dubois on soprano sax, Ben Herrington on trombone, Rob Henke on trumpet and Michael Lytle on bass clarinet) propelled the sound in a thoroughly exhilarating way, while the rhythm section of Jesse Krakow (bass) and Leo Ciesa (drums) adroitly set the pace, keeping up with the music’s unpredictable shifts. Indeed, in my mind I described Doctor Nerve as “a big band with a solid foundation of metal riffs, mixed with some seriously punk attitude.” Though their music is clearly not everyone’s cup of tea, many of the attendees thought they were one of the undisputed highlights of the festival.

Nick Didkovsky of Doctor Nerve

With a storm threat successfully averted, the heat and humidity had already made their comeback when Consider The Source’s turn on the stage arrived. The three young band members, all dressed in white, loose-fitting clothing that gave a nod to the Eastern component so prominent in their music, were not exactly well-known to most of the crowd, in spite of being very active on the live circuit of the New York/New Jersey region. Like other bands invited to perform at prog festivals for the first time, they were not familiar with the progressive rock scene, as they had previously associated the genre with the symphonic bands of the Seventies and their devoted followers. With four albums under their belt, and extensive touring experience both in the US and abroad, they were obviously very much at home on a stage. Dashing guitarist Gabriel Marin, his blonde mane hidden beneath a quirky cap, sported an obviously custom-made contraption – a fretless double-necked guitar – that allowed him to produce a wide range of sounds. Like many modern instrumental bands, they had a hard, almost metal edge that elicited comparisons with the likes of ProgDay alumni Canvas Solaris and Scale The Summit, though tempered by the warm, organic sound of ethnic percussion. The Indian influence, though less evident than in a quintessential “Indo-prog” band like Shakti, came often to the fore, seamlessly intertwined with fiery fusion and hypnotic space-rock cadences, driven along by bassist John Ferrara and drummer Louis Miller, who tackled elaborate, King Crimson-style polyrhythms with consummate skill. Like a bare-bones Mahavishnu Orchestra (stripped of violin and keyboards) on massive amounts of steroids, modern enough to appeal to the younger, jam-band set, but also with a clear jazz-rock bent – occasionally laced with a funky swagger – that emerged particularly towards the end of their set, Consider The Source took no prisoners, and their blistering performance earned them many new fans.

Gabriel Marin of Consider the Source

We had seen headliners Ilúvatar barely two months ago at the Jammin’ Java, so when their turn came (somewhat late on schedule) we were in a relaxed mood, knowing that their set would be not as demanding than most of the other bands, though definitely every bit as good in terms of quality. The Baltimore quintet were the only band on the lineup to fit the conventional prog mould, though laced with classic and hard rock influences, and solidly song-based – in this respect almost paralleling 2010 Saturday headliners Flash. This was in some ways an even stronger performance than the one witnessed in early July, with lead vocalist Jeff Sirody increasingly at ease in his frontman role. The set opened with longer, more complex compositions, where the influence of Genesis (especially their late Seventies period) was unmistakable, and Jim Rezek’s masterful keyboards got their chance to shine and wow the audience, then moved on to the more streamlined material, in which Sirody’s voice was allowed to rock out. The rhythm section of Dean Morekas (the barefoot bassist) and Chris Mack provided a solid foundation for Rezek and Dennis Mullin’s clear, melodic lead guitar. Unlike other so-called “neo-prog” bands, Ilúvatar avoid sounding cheesy or overtly derivative, and their keen sense of melody makes them eminently listenable, even for those who – like myself – prefer more spice than sugar with their music. With extensive experience as a live outfit (festivals included), Ilúvatar were like a well-oiled machine, and each member gave his best on stage. All in all, it was a very enjoyable performance – which ended when the sun had already disappeared from the horizon and darkness was setting in – and the perfect conclusion to a day characterized by a high intensity quotient.

Dean Morekas and Jim Rezek of Ilúvatar

After helping with the clean-up, we headed back to the hotel to get changed and have some dinner before the customary end-of-festival poolside party. Unfortunately, the weather was not yet done with us, and treated us to a veritable display of pyrotechnics – a fierce heat storm with wild streaks of lightning in the night sky, copious rainfall, and the added excitement of a tornado warning. Needless to say, there was no going near the pool in that weather, but – thanks to the kindness of the staff – the party was held in the hotel lobby, and a great time was had by all.

It was with a touch of sadness that we said goodbye to our friends on Monday morning, before we headed home again. The past weekend was not one that will be easily forgotten, in spite of the weather’s lack of cooperation. Everything else had been perfect, from the music (as usual, enhanced by the pristine sound quality) to the choice of caterers, far superior to the previous years. However, probably the most positive feeling I brought home from the festival was seeing the much-reviled US prog community rally together and decree the edition’s unqualified success, with an almost unprecedented amount of tickets sold, and the presence of some new, younger faces among the audience. The realization that NEARfest is over for good and the FarFest cancellation must have sounded a wake-up call for those who want the scene to thrive, and it was enough to guarantee the festival’s survival for at least another year – and hopefully much longer.

Interestingly, the majority of the bands on this year’s lineup were not easily tagged as “prog” in the conventional sense of the word. On the other hand, their music owed very little to the newfangled (and often soporific) “post-prog” trend spearheaded by Porcupine Tree and their ilk, and offered instead an exciting blend of raw energy, endearing quirkiness and serious chops, liberally spiced with world-music influences. In particular, the power trio format seems to be a perfect fit for the ProgDay stage, as proved by this year’s lineup as well as last year’s, which saw spectacular performances from the likes of Mörglbl, Zevious and Freak Kitchen.

Even more so than the previous editions I had attended, ProgDay 2012 was a celebration of the sheer power and joy of live music. The very atmosphere of the festival, by encouraging bands and audience members to mingle before and after each set (and not just at the hotel bar for the often cliquish “after-parties”), does not foster  the self-centered antics that have occasionally marred higher-profile events. Spending a whole weekend together reinforces the impression of an almost family-like occasion that the larger scale of the other festivals does not allow. And then, even if the open-air setting makes it easy to “tune out”, so to speak, it is also much easier to concentrate by just sitting in your chair and letting the music sink in without the restrictions of a theatre – however comfortable it might be. There is also very little resembling the painstaking dissection of every single note or stage moment that accompanies the bigger festivals. Even if ProgDay may look like a country picnic rather than a “serious” event, the people who attend it year after year are as seriously into the music as those who crowd the hallowed halls of the Zoellner Arts Center.

As usual in my event reviews, the final paragraph is dedicated to all the people who made the festival a success – first of all, chief organizer Michael Bennett and his far-reaching vision, the organizing committee, all the volunteers who worked hard in spite of the punishing heat, the ultra-professional sound and stage crew, and obviously all of the bands. On a personal level, I would also like to thank the collective members of Ephemeral Sun and Accordo dei Contrari, Kathleen Supove of Doctor Nerve, Bob Lord of Dreadnaught, John Ferrara and Louis Miller of Consider The Source, Debi Byrd, Paul and Debbie Sears, “Romantic Warriors” José Zegarra Holder, Adele Schmidt and their daughter Paloma, Mike Potter of Orion Studios, Steve Feigenbaum of Cuneiform Records, Lew Fisher, Jeff and Coralita Wilson, Rick Dashiell, Jon and Andrea Reed, Noel Levan and Laura Dent, fellow Stranglers fan Steve Astley, Chris Lamka, Chris Buckley, John Hagelbarger, Mike Visaggio Missy Ferguson, Connie from Missouri (with whom we had a nice talk about cooking), Judson J. Patterson and his fantastic Italian-style sodas, our dear friends Michael Inman and Djalma Carvalho, and – last but not least – the lovely Helaine Carson Burch, who provided some of her outstanding photos for this review.

Links:
http://www.progday.net

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While other progressive rock festivals have been experiencing problems, or even folded altogether, ProgDay – the world’s longest-running event of this kind –  still soldiers on, and is about to celebrate its 18th anniversary. As usual, the 2012 edition of the “proggers’ picnic” is scheduled to take place on Labor Day Weekend (September 1-2) on the tree-ringed grounds of Storybook Farm, Chapel Hill (North Carolina).

This year’s lineup places a heavy emphasis on homegrown bands, with the whole of the Sunday lineup hailing from the  East Coast of the US  – a bold move indeed, and one  that will afford a unique opportunity for those outfits to showcase their talent  before an appreciative audience in an idyllic setting. The Washington/Baltimore region will be represented by local favourites Ephemeral Sun and Ilúvatar, the lively New York scene by avant-proggers Doctor Nerve and über-eclectic trio Consider The Source, and New England by another couple of label-defying acts, Birdsongs of the Mesozoic (from Boston) and Dreadnaught (from New Hampshire).  Only two non-US acts are scheduled to perform: Italian outfit Accordo dei Contrari, whose 2011 album Kublai garnered the approval of the prog community on both sides of the Atlantic, and Montreal-based quartet Karcius. On the whole, ProgDay’s 2012 sums up all the distinctive features of modern progressive rock, ranging from time-honoured tradition to cutting-edge trends.

Those who are interested in attending will be able to purchase patron passes ($ 140) or ordinary weekend passes ($ 90) in advance from the festival’s website (until August 15). Both kinds of tickets, as well as single-day passes, will also be available at the gate. Detailed information on the event, including music samples, a link to the official hotel and other practical tips, can be found at http://www.progday.net.

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Even though it comes slightly late in comparison to other blogs and websites, this retrospective of the past year has been in the pipeline for a while. It is a first time for me, though obviously I have participated in quite a few surveys of this kind in my time as a collaborator of various music sites. However, the year 2011 has been uncommonly rich in excellent releases covering the whole of the progressive rock spectrum – similar in this to 2009 rather than the somewhat lackluster 2010.

My activity as a reviewer has also reached an unprecedented level in the past 12 months, and this (as well as other factors) have allowed me to listen to a wider range and number of new albums than in previous years – though not all of the albums I will be mentioning in the following paragraphs have been the object of a review. I have also been actively involved on the prog scene, attending festivals and gigs and keeping up a steady network of contacts with artists, label owners and fellow reviewers and fans. As the end-of-year statistics point out, the total number of views received by this blog in 2011 exceeded any of the expectations I had at the start of this venture, one and a half years ago.

Obviously, I cannot claim to have heard each and every prog (and related) album released in 2011, and quite of few of the big-name releases of the past year will be conspicuously absent from this overview. I will also refrain from using the usual list format, let alone a “Top 10/20/100” one, in spite of its undeniable popularity with music fans. While I am sure that everyone will be very curious to learn about my # 1 album of 2011,  this curiosity will have to remain unsatisfied, because I hardly ever think in terms of “absolute favourites”, and would be hard put to name my favourite band or artist (or literary author, for that matter). Although most “year in review” pieces do contain a measure of narcissism, the main aim of this post is to stimulate people’s curiosity, as well as debate, rather than turning it into a pointless competition of the “my list is better than yours” sort. We are all adult enough to be aware of the mostly subjective nature of lists, overviews, retrospectives and the like, and hopefully no one here is out to change other people’s minds.

In 2011, the prog “revival” reached unparalleled proportions, bolstered by the many opportunities offered by the Internet. In spite of the loud cries of woe about a supposed “death of the CD”, the number of acts that keep releasing their material in physical format is still quite high, and many of them still choose to put extra care in the artwork and liner notes, with often remarkable results. While the oversaturation of what remains very much a niche market cannot be denied, it is also true that high-quality productions are far from scarce, and the advent of legal streaming sites like the excellent Progstreaming has made it possible for everyone to sample an album before taking the plunge. Unfortunately, the wealth of music available either in digital or physical form does not correspond to higher availability of performing opportunities for those acts who still believe in the power of live performances. The shocking announcement of NEARfest 2011’s cancellation, at the end of March, rocked the prog fandom for months, and even the subsequent announcement of NEARfest Apocalypse for June 2012 did not allay many people’s fears concerning the dwindling range of gigging opportunities, especially here in the US (Europe, in spite of the economic crisis, seems to be doing much better in this respect). The prog community is also splintering in a way that, coupled with a worryingly nostalgic attitude and increasing reluctance to leave one’s own comfort zone, might spell disaster for the future.

2011 marked not only the return of a number of high-profile acts, but also some outstanding recording debuts. If I was forced at gunpoint to choose a favourite, this award would probably go to Texas-based trio Herd of Instinct’s self-titled debut, the first album released on Firepool Records, legendary Californian band Djam Karet’s own label. An almost entirely instrumental effort with the exception of one (gorgeous) song, the Herd’s debut shares this format with another of the year’s milestones, Accordo dei Contrari’s Kublai (whose only song features the incomparable vocals of Canterbury legend Richard Sinclair). These two albums, as well as Marbin’s classy Breaking the Cycle and Dialeto’s intriguing Chromatic Freedom, illustrate how the song form can be reinvented in such a way as not to disrupt the flow of the music, incorporating the vocals into a fabric that hinges on complex instrumental interplay.

In the realm of the purely instrumental releases, top marks go to Gösta Berlings Saga’s stunning third album, Glue Works (“Island” alone is worth the price of admission), alongside a trio of AltrOck Productions releases – Ske’s elegant 1000 Autunni (the first solo project by Yugen keyboardist Paolo Botta), Calomito’s intense Cane di Schiena and Camembert’s ebullient Schnörgl Attack – and a couple of outstanding offers from the ever-reliable MoonJune Records, the world-jazz of Slivovitz’s Bani Ahead and the superb testimony of Moraine’s NEARfest 2010 set, Metamorphic Rock. Lovers of creative percussion will surely enjoy Knitting By Twilight’s enchanting Weathering (and possibly check out the Providence collective’s previous releases); while Lunatic Soul’s Impressions (the third solo album by Riverside’s Mariusz Duda) will satisfy those addicted to haunting, ethnic-tinged soundscapes. On a more traditional note, Derek Sherinian’s Oceana presents a solid example of guitar- and keyboard-based progressive fusion, which spotlights ensemble playing rather than individual displays of technical fireworks.

The 2011 releases that feature vocals as an essential part run the gamut from experimental to melody- and song-oriented. Big Block 454’s quirky Bells and Proclamations, and another couple of AltrOck releases – The Nerve Institute’s multifaceted Architect of Flesh-Density, and Dave Willey and Friends’ moving homage to Willey’s father, the beautiful Immeasurable Currents (review forthcoming) – are outstanding instances of the first category. More in a jazz than a rock vein, Boris Savoldelli’s Biocosmopolitan showcases the Italian artist’s superlative vocal technique, all the while offering music that is eminently listenable and upbeat. The ultra-eclectic Zappa homage that is Electric Sorcery’s Believe in Your Own Best Friend throws a lot of diverse influences into its heady mix of outrageous storyline and constantly challenging music. On the other hand, Man On Fire’s Chrysalis is a blueprint for modern “crossover prog”, seamlessly blending the accessibility of Eighties-style quality pop with some seriously intricate instrumental work; while fellow 10T Records band Mars Hollow make a true quantum leap with their second album, World in Front of Me, which follows in the footsteps of early Yes in terms of successfully marrying gorgeous pop melodies with instrumental flights of fancy. However, the crown for 2011 in the realm of “mainstream” progressive rock goes to Phideaux’s magnificent Snowtorch, an incredibly dense concentrate of haunting vocals, memorable tunes and thought-provoking lyrical content.

Some landmark albums released during the past year are at least tangentially related to progressive rock. In all probability, my personal award of most played album of the year should go to Black Country Communion’s 2, a more mature, well-rounded effort than its barnstorming predecessor. Thanks to the Glenn Hughes-led quartet, classic hard rock is undergoing a renaissance, with a recognizable yet subtly updated sound. BCC guitarist Joe Bonamassa’s latest opus, Dust Bowl, while not revolutionary in any sense, features scintillating guitar and soulful vocals in its modern treatment of time-honoured blues modes. In a completely different vein, Kate Bush’s ninth studio album (not counting the rather controversial Director’s Cut, released a few months earlier), 50 Words for Snow, shows an artist that still possesses the ability and the power to surprise her followers. English contemporary classical ensemble North Sea Radio Orchestra’s I A Moon (one of the year’s biggest discoveries for me, thanks to a friend’s recommendation) offer a mesmerizing blend of Old-World folk, avant-garde and academic chamber music that is, in many ways, much more progressive than the slew of cookie-cutter acts so revered in prog circles.

Some other albums, while not quite making the cut, have attracted enough of my interest, and are very much worth checking out: AltrOck releases Sanhedrin’s Ever After, Abrete Gandul’s Enjambre Sismico, Humble Grumble’s Flanders Fields, Factor Burzaco’s II and October EquusSaturnal, Ozric TentaclesPaper Monkeys, CopernicusCipher and Decipher, and From.uz’s Quartus Artifactus; for the more conservatively-minded listeners, The AnabasisBack From Being Gone, La Coscienza di Zeno’s self-titled debut, and TCP’s Fantastic Dreamer also deserve a mention. There have also been a number of albums that, even though heard superficially, and mainly in the final weeks of the year, have left enough of an impression to make me want to write about them at some point – chief among those, Discipline’s To Shatter All Accord.

As I anticipated at the opening of this essay, my readers will be sure to notice some glaring omissions from this overview. The most noticeable ones  are probably Jakszyk Fripp CollinsA Scarcity of Miracles and Steven Wilson’s Grace for Drowning – undoubtedly two of the most highly rated releases of the year. Unfortunately, in spite of repeated listens, neither album has yet clicked with me, even if I clearly perceive their very high standard of quality. Though I hesitate to use the term “disappointment”, The DecemberistsThe King Is Dead did not resonate with me in the same way as its predecessors; its songs, however, acquired a new dimension when performed live.

Some other high-profile 2011 releases have failed to register on my personal meter. Such is the case of Opeth’s Heritage, Karmakanic’s In a Perfect World, and White Willow’s Terminal Twilight – all excellent albums, but lacking in that undefinable “something” that would kindle my enthusiasm. Others (such as Wobbler’s acclaimed Rites at Dawn or Glass Hammer’s Cor Cordium), though in no way displeasing to the ear, are too staunchly, unabashedly retro to truly impress,. As to YesFly from Here (possibly the year’s most eagerly awaited release), I am not ashamed to admit that I have refused to listen to it – even though I own most of the band’s back catalogue, and their earlier albums get regular spins in my player. With up-and-coming acts struggling to get their music across, I believe that spending too much time on the interpersonal dynamics of a band that do not particularly need to be supported is quite detrimental to the scene as a whole.

Some other albums that have been very positively received (at least by part of the fandom) have escaped my attention completely, in some cases for lack of interest (Dream Theater’s A Dramatic Turn of Events), or simply for lack of listening opportunities (Agents of Mercy’s The Black Forest, Mastodon’s The Hunter, Van Der Graaf Generator’s A Grounding in Numbers, The Tangent’s COMM, among others). Hopefully I will manage to hear at least some of those discs in the near future, and possibly write reviews of them. With the overwhelming quantity of music released in the past year, the very concrete danger of getting burned out (and therefore becoming unable to appreciate anything at all) is always lurking around the corner.

2011 has also been an outstanding year for concerts, as witnessed by the live reviews I have published in these pages. Besides seeing my beloved Blue Oyster Cult not once but twice (after a 25-year wait), I was treated to an outstanding edition of ProgDay, a stunning “goodbye” performance by Phideaux at the Orion Studios, the electrifying Two of a Perfect Trio tour, and the highly successful one-off CuneiFest (to name but a few). While the NEARfest cancellation cast a pall on the prog scene for some time, bands and artists are still doing their best to bring their music on stage for the benefits of those fans who still love to attend live shows.

Unlike other sites, I will refrain from mentioning “prog personalities”, or awarding any other such dubious prizes. As I previously stated, the whole point of this piece is to encourage people to delve into the abundant musical output of the past year, especially in regard to those lesser-known acts that deserve more exposure. With a few highly-awaited releases already in the pipeline for the coming months, it remains to be seen if 2012 will be able to keep up with its predecessor. On behalf of the survival of non-mainstream music, we all hope this will be the case.

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